Andrea Steffens

THE REASONING FOR SEASONING, more by Preeti Sharan, clinical dietitian

Spices have been around for centuries and yet the Western diet is still adjusting to Tabasco, Chipotle and Curry. There is indisputable scientific evidence that almost all spices contain chemicals that have profound health benefits, thus protecting the body from numerous grave illnesses and in many cases acting as an efficient treatment for established diseases.

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From the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma- stories

Why Stories?

Why Stories? Catastrophic life experiences such as those associated with the refugee experience, torture, and natural disasters, have long lasting effects on the survivor. Some of these events are linked to the historical memory of an entire nation or a society. Almost everyone throughout the world can associate some historical meaning with the cities of Hiroshima, Pompei; the date of September 11, 2001; the name Nelson Mandela. Other traumatic life experiences caused by human cruelty may remain hidden for centuries; maybe forever. Little is known, for example, of the suffering of those women raped during the ethnic cleansing in Bosnia, or the fate of children in Afghanistan left homeless and without parents.

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trauma after medical events

Recently I picked up a couple of Diane Ackerman's books.  First  was: One Hundred Words for Love which is about her encounter with the potential and real devastation of strokes. In this case, it was her husband who had the stroke and what struck me was the obvious psychological trauma; hers and her husbands.  Trauma causing medical events is not a new subject for this site but I couldn't resist  reviewing the book here because it is so touching, real and grounded in solid understanding both psychologically (her own) and of the literal brain. Ackerman had a deep understanding about  brain function from researching and writing an earlier book: An Alchemy of Mind.  Being a brain function freak, I began my reading with An Alchemy of Mind -- a lyrical treatment of often dry research, her book is rich and rife with metaphor.  For me, as both a poet and a traumatologist, it was a much needed break into the poetic world. I recommend going along with Diane Ackerman on her exploration.

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